From the Kitchen of Laura Wydeveld

Nut Bars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are a good source of protein…but remember they do have dates which is concentrated sugar and coconut oil, so eat in moderation (sugar free option at bottom)

INGREDIENTS:

8 cups of mixed nuts – soaked and dehydrated (roasted in oven on lowest setting over night)

15 large dates (moist and pits removed)

Almond Butter (most of a jar – raw unsweetened)

½ cup of coconut butter

2/3 cup of coconut oil

Dash of Himalayan Salt

OPTIONAL – coconut flakes – chocolate nibs

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Blend nuts and dates until finely ground (need to do in small amounts until all nuts and dates mixed)
  2. In large bowl blend nuts with other ingredients
  3. Spread out into baking pan – I have a cookie sheet with a ½ inch lip that works well – or two 9 x 12 baking pans
  4. Press down firmly – place in refrigerator until well chilled
  5. Cut into pieces – I wrap some so they are ready to go, the rest I place in air tight containers
  6. Store in fridge until ready to eat as they do melt and will fall apart

Note:

The amounts are approximate as I cook by feel….you want the mixture to be “sticky” so that it holds together…so I add more almond butter or a bit more coconut oil….experiment

Can break up and use for topping on ice cream …. Place in bowl and pour a little nut milk or coconut milk on

*** I make this without dates and add stevia as the sugar….coconut sugar is also a good alternative as it does not raise your glycemic index as much …. Without dates it does require more almond butter

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Nut Bars

From the Kitchen of Laura Wydeveld

Nut Bars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are a good source of protein…but remember they do have dates which is concentrated sugar and coconut oil, so eat in moderation (sugar free option at bottom)

INGREDIENTS:

8 cups of mixed nuts – soaked and dehydrated (roasted in oven on lowest setting over night)

15 large dates (moist and pits removed)

Almond Butter (most of a jar – raw unsweetened)

½ cup of coconut butter

2/3 cup of coconut oil

Dash of Himalayan Salt

OPTIONAL – coconut flakes – chocolate nibs

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Blend nuts and dates until finely ground (need to do in small amounts until all nuts and dates mixed)
  2. In large bowl blend nuts with other ingredients
  3. Spread out into baking pan – I have a cookie sheet with a ½ inch lip that works well – or two 9 x 12 baking pans
  4. Press down firmly – place in refrigerator until well chilled
  5. Cut into pieces – I wrap some so they are ready to go, the rest I place in air tight containers
  6. Store in fridge until ready to eat as they do melt and will fall apart

Note:

The amounts are approximate as I cook by feel….you want the mixture to be “sticky” so that it holds together…so I add more almond butter or a bit more coconut oil….experiment

Can break up and use for topping on ice cream …. Place in bowl and pour a little nut milk or coconut milk on

*** I make this without dates and add stevia as the sugar….coconut sugar is also a good alternative as it does not raise your glycemic index as much …. Without dates it does require more almond butter

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Sprouting Seeds

Sprouting SeedsIf you go onto YouTube you will find a number of ways to sprout seeds. The following is how we do it…Experiment and find the way you prefer.

We obtain our seeds from Got Sprouts (www.gotsprouts.com). They are organic and are produced in a controlled environment so the quality is extremely good. They also are very helpful if you need help with any part of sprouting, juicing, dehydrating, and smoothie making.

If you want to grow wheatgrass, sunflower, pea seeds you will soak and then plant the seeds. If you want alfalfa, radish, broccoli, clover (etc) or mung, lentil, garbanzo, or adzuki beans you will use a container, soak, then rinse until they sprout. (See chart for guidance).

My husband grows the wheatgrass and sunflower seeds. He soaks the wheatgrass for two days, rinsing twice a day. Then on the morning of the third day he plants them. He uses a black garden tray, fills it with 2 inches of dirt (usually organic). Then he rinses and drains the seeds. Next he spreads them evenly over the top of the dirt and waters them. They are watered twice daily. In about 7 days we harvest them. We juice the wheatgrass and freeze in ice cube trays so he can have two cubes daily. Jim Miller has an excellent video on how to grow wheatgrass.

For sunflower seeds you need to soak three days. Then, on the fourth day, fill a black garden tray with two inches of dirt. Next rinse and drain the seeds. Spread the seeds evenly over the dirt. Next place another black tray on top and with a bit of weight. Twice a day, remove try to water then replace. Remove tray once the sunflower sprouts are pushing the tray up. Continue to water twice a day until the plants are about 3 ½ – 4 inches tall.

Both the wheatgrass and sunflower seeds need to be kept at a comfortable temp of about 75 degrees. They also need to be kept in a dark area until the last day. Then some light will help green them up a bit.

Now for on the counter sprouting….

  1. I grow sprouts all the time on my kitchen counter. I use wide mouth mason jars with either a metal screen or plastic mesh for lid. Remember there are a number of ways to sprout…this is what works for me.
  2. Place 2 Tablespoons of seeds (alfalfa, clover, radish or broccoli) in the jar.
  3. Cover the seeds with 2 or 3 inches of tepid water and soak (see other sheet for length of time)
  4. Gently rinse and drain – set sideways on counter ….. Gently rinse and drain twice a day until the seeds have sprouted (beans have a small tail and for the seeds look for their first leaves. I store the sprouts in the jar in the refrigerator, gently rinsing and draining once a day to keep fresh.

I make sure that seeds are evenly spread out in the jar as it sits on its side. I place them on their side to get more air circulation.

The attached chart gives you soak times and length of time for sprouting. So, need to plan ahead if you want to make a salad, dips etc. Or if you are like me, spouts are always in the frig and others are starting on the counter.

sprouting seeds chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy!!!

Laura and Steve Wydeveld

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Banana/Mango Smoothie

By Jean Sumner

 

Banana Mango Smoothie

 

 

 

INGREDIENTS:

1 organic Banana

1 organic Mango, peeled and pit removed

¼ cup shredded organic coconut

½ cup coconut milk

1 handful of greens

Water to the consistency you like

 

DIRECTIONS:

1. Place all ingredients into a blender, blend and enjoy

2. You may want to add chia seeds, flax seed meal or chia seeds to add some more nutrition

 






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The Benefits of Purple Cabbage, Colorful Slaw with Citrus Dressing

By: Jean Sumner

 

The Benefits of Purple Cabbage, Colorful Slaw with Citrus Dressing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cabbage is a super food.  It is cruciferous vegetable.  These vegetables have been identified as helping to prevent cancer.  Purple cabbage is loaded with anti-oxidants, the dark color is indicative of a high level of anti-oxidants just like blueberries.  Cabbage is loaded with dietary fiber which prevents excess cholesterol from entering your bloodstream.

The potassium content in 1 cup of chopped purple cabbage is 216 milligrams. Potassium keeps your body’s fluid level from fluctuating to unhealthy volumes, and it is recommended that we consume 4,700 milligrams a day to maintain healthy blood pressure levels. Potassium also prevents heart muscle stress by supporting the contraction that fuels your heartbeat.

Purple cabbage has 85 percent of the daily requirement of Vitamin C.  Vitamin C protects cells from the DNA and compositional destruction that toxins create.  It also has over 20 percent of the daily recommendation of Vitamin A.

Cabbage is low in calories so it is the perfect food for weight loss.   It has only 33 calories for a cup of cooked cabbage.

It is full of vitamin K and anthocyanins that help with mental function and concentration. These nutrients also prevent nerve damage, improving your defense against Alzheimer’s disease, and dementia. Red cabbage has the highest amount of these power nutrients.

Cabbage can help dry up oily skin and reverse acne.  Internally sulfur is essential for keratin, a protein substance necessary for healthy hair, nails, and skin.

The natural red pigments of purple cabbage (betalains) is said to lower blood sugar levels and boost insulin production. Betalains have powerful anti-inflammatory properties just like beets.

 






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Bi-Monthly Conference Call-Dr. Daniel Thomas

Dr. Danial ThomasThis conference call is extremely informative.  Dr. Thomas has 28 years of clinical experience.  He is a leader in preventative and anti-aging medicine.  Join us as he discusses living to 100 and beyond.

Click Here to listen to Dr. Thomas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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